Dragonfly Species Increase in the UK due to Rising Temperatures

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Rising Temperatures

Species have a way to adapt to environments to survive and accommodate the changes in their ecosystem. A recent study found dragonflies population to increase in the United Kingdom’s area due to human factors that have affected the environment and its temperature. These changes in biodiversity demonstrate how nature has its ways of healing and adaptation without harming the environment, not at all like our developing society.

A recent study indicates that six different species in the last 25 years have spurred in the Western areas of the UK, and the resident dragonfly population has increased by 40% since 1970. Apart from the new colonist dragonfly species, the Dainty damselfly has returned to the UK after being wiped out in 1953’s coastal floods.

Scientists speculate that the improvements in water quality and the restoration of wetlands, like ponds and rivers, are factors that could have increased the dragonfly population. Also, most of these new dragonflies can fly long continental distances to find warmer weather, allowing biologists to conclude that the rising temperatures are attracting new dragonfly species. This can be good news to foreign dragonflies, but the resident dragonflies are fleeing to colder temperatures because they cannot survive in what once was their perfect habitat.

The survival of the fittest has been a constant struggle in nature. Still, now we have to sit back and reflect on whether our current mass production system and compulsive consumption will lead us to the survival of the fittest. Eventually, we will also need to look for better habitats that can allow us to adapt and survive.

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