Is it the end of the war on drugs?

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On November 4th, one thing WAS certain, voters overwhelmingly approved measures against the war on drugs. This included the legalization of marijuana or medical marijuana in New Jersey, Arizona, Montana, Mississippi and South Dakota, the decriminalization of psychedelic mushrooms in Washington, D.C. and the decriminalization of all drugs in Oregon.

Oregon

Oregonians overhwlmingly approved Measure 109 and Measure 110. Measure 109 would allow patients over 21 to buy, possess and consume psychedelic drugs at psilocybin service centers, under professional supervision. Whereas, Measure 110 would decriminalize personal possession of drugs like heroin, methamphetamine, LSD and MDMA — the measure passed with 60% of votes. Instead of a war on drugs, Measure 110 would establish a drug addiction treatment program funded by its marijuana tax revenue.

Lawless Frontier: High Crimes in the High Seas

With Oregon’s Measure 110, the Oregon Health Authority would grant or revoke licenses related to psilocybin therapy. This means that the first psilocybin clinics are expected to open by January 2023 after a two-year implementation plan.

“Measure 110 is arguably the biggest blow to the war on drugs to date. It shifts the focus where it belongs — on people and public health — and removes one of the most common justifications for law enforcement to harass, arrest, prosecute, incarcerate, and deport people. As we saw with the domino effect of marijuana legalization, we expect this victory to inspire other states to enact their own drug decriminalization policies that prioritize health over punishment.”—Kassandra Frederique, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance that spearheaded the measure

Consent for all

A true system revolution is unfolding.

Washington D.C.

In 2019 city of Denver became the first U.S. city to decriminalize psychedelic mushrooms. This week’s Washington D.C.’s initiative 81 is very similar to that of Denver’s: it decriminalizes the cultivation and possession of “entheogenic plants and fungi.” However, in both Denver and Washington, D.C., it remains illegal to sell psychedelic mushrooms.

New Jersey, Arizona, Montana, South Dakota, Mississippi…

Following the Election Day results, 15 states now have legal weed to some extent. On November 4th, New Jersey, Arizona, Montana and South Dakota approved measures and initiatives to legalize marijuana entirely. Whereas, in Mississippi, a medical marijuana program was approved.

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